A Book of Fruits and Flowers: Of Quinces

Quinces

quince

The best way to Preserve Quinces.

First pare and coare the Quinces, and boyle them in faire water till they be very tender, not covering them, then taking them out of the water, take to every pound of them, two pound ofSugar, and half a pint of water, boyle it to a Syrupe, scumming it well, then put in some of the Jelly that is washed from the Quince kernels, and after that, making it boyle a little, put in your Quinces, boyle them very fast, keeping the holes upward as neer as you can, for fear of breaking, and when they are so tender that you may thrust a rush through them, take them off, and put them up in your glasses, having first saved some Syrupe till it be cold to fill up your glasses.

A speciall Remembrance in doing them.

When you Preserve Quinces, or make Marmalade, take the Kernels out of the raw Quinces, and wash off the Jelly that groweth about them, in faire water, then straine the water and Jelly from the kernels, through some fine Cobweb laune, and put the same into the Marmalade, or preserved Quinces, when they are well scum’d, but put not so much into your Quinces, as into the Marmalade, for it will Jelly the Syrupe too much; put six or seven spoonfulls of Syrupe into the Jelly. Before you put it into the Marmalade, you must boyle your Quinces more for Marmalade, then to preserve your Quinces, and least of them when you make your clear Cakes.

When you would preserve your Quinces white, you must not cover them in the boyling, and you must put halfe as much Sugar more for the white, as for the other. When you would have them red, you must cover them in the boyling.

To Pickle Quinces.

Boyle yourQuinces that you intend to keep, whole and unpared, in faire water, till they be soft, but not too violently for feare you break them, when they are soft take them out, and boyle someQuincespared, quarter’d, and coar’d, and the parings of the Quinceswith them in the same liquor, to make it strong, and when they have boyled a good time, enough to make the liquor of sufficient strength, take out the quarteredQuinces and parings, and put the liquor into a pot big enough to receive all the Quinces, both whole and quartered, and put them into it, when the liquor is thorow cold, and so keep them for your use close covered.

To make Quince Cakes.

Prepare your Quinces, and take the just weight of them in Sugar, beaten finely, and searcing halfe of it, then of the rest make a Syrupe, using the ordinary proportion of a pint of water to a pound of Sugar, let your Quinces be well beaten, and when the Syrupe is cand height, put in your Quince, and boyle it to a past, keeping it with continuall stirring, then work it up with the beatenS ugar which you reserved, and these Cakes will tast well of the Quinces.

To make Printed Quidony of Quinces.

Take two pound ofQuinces, paired, coared, and cut in small pieces, and put them into a faire posnet, with a quart of faire water, and when they are boyled tender, put into them one pound of Sugar clarified, with halfe a pint of faire water, let them boyle till all the fruit fall to the bottom of the posnet, then let the liquid substance run through a faire linnen cloath into a clean bason, then put it into a posnet, and let it boyle till it come to a jelly, then Print it in your Moulds, and turne it into your boxes. You shall know when it is ready to Print, by rouling it on the back of a Spoone.