The Candy Maker’s Guide: Sticky Candies

STICKY CANDIES.

Perhaps there is nothing more annoying to the trade than sticky boiled sugars. All clear goods when exposed to the atmosphere will turn damp, especially in wet weather. It is a question of degree, some slightly and some will run almost to syrup; it is impossible to obviate the former but the latter can be prevented. Great care should be used in adding the lowering, whether cream of tartar or glucose, too much of either will cause the goods to run immediately after they are turned out. Weak or inferior sugars, or not sufficient boiling, has also this effect. We know of no reliable agent which will altogether prevent this result but we do know that a careful arrangement of the different proportions, using good sugar and well boiling greatly mitigate, if not altogether prevent the grievance. Goods intended for exposure should contain just sufficient lowering to prevent the boil from growing grainy and boiled right up to the standard. Of course different sugars will carry more or less lowering, but this can be easily tested by the workman. A few experiments will determine the exact quantity for each boil. There is no excuse for drops sticking in bottles when corked, this should not occur, if it does, the fault is in the making; the water has a great deal to do with causing the candies to be sticky. The writer has experienced this in several country places, where the only supply of this indispensable ingredient was drawn from the artesian wells. To look at it, it was all that could be desired—a beautiful, cold, clear and wholesome beverage. Of its chemical constituents I do not pretend to give an opinion, but the drops and other clear boils for which it was used got damp directly after they were exposed, and would have run to a syrup had they not been covered up. The goods keep all right in bottles, but it is very annoying, not to speak of the injury and loss to a business, when this is the position with regard to the water supply. The only remedy we could suggest, and which was very successful, was powdered borax. We used this in the proportion of a teaspoonful to every 14 lbs. of sugar adding it just as the sugar began to boil. Borax has been found useful with any water when making goods to be exposed in the window or on the counters, such as taffies, rocks and clear boiled sugars generally. Where the supply of water, as in most large towns is suitable, given good sugar, cream of tartar or glucose, in proper proportions, and careful boiling up to the standard, the addition of borax is unnecessary and should only be resorted to under special circumstances.

PLAIN TAFFY.

14 lbs. White Sugar.
2 quarts Water.
½ ounce Cream Tartar.

Process.—This is an easy and capital recipe to begin with. The process is practically the same as for all other clear goods, but the ingredients being fewer there is little chance of their getting complicated. With a thermometer it is hardly possible to make a mistake, besides it will make the instruction more intelligible: should he not possess this appliance, we must ask that the instructions “How to boil sugar” should be committed to memory, as it would be tedious and a great waste of time and space to keep explaining how to tell the different degrees through which the sugar passes before it comes to the point required for the different goods given in this book. For this and other reasons I will assume the learner to be working with one.

Put the sugar and water in a clean pan, place it on the fire and stir it occasionally till melted; when it comes to the boil add the cream of tartar and put a lid on the pan; allow it to boil in this way for ten minutes, remove the lid and immerse the bottom part of the thermometer in the boiling liquid and allow it to remain in this position until it records 310 degrees, then quickly take out the thermometer, lift off the pan and pour contents into frames, tins, or on a pouring slab, which have been previously oiled. If on a pouring slab, mark the boil into bars or squares, while warm, with a knife or taffy cutter: when quite cold it is ready for sale.

 

LEMON TAFFY.

14 lbs. White Sugar.
½ ounce Cream Tartar.
Saffron Coloring.
2 quarts Water.
Lemon Flavoring.

Process.—Proceed as directed for plain taffy. When the sugar reaches 305 degrees, add a few drops of saffron color; when it reaches 310 degrees, add a few drops of oil of lemon and pour out immediately into frames or tins; or if on pouring slab, mark out into bars or squares before it gets cold. The pouring slab should be level so that the sheet should be all the same thickness.

BUTTERSCOTCH.

8 lbs. White Sugar.
1 lb. Fresh Butter.
Lemon Flavoring.
¼ oz. Cream of Tartar.
1 quart Water.

Process.—Melt the sugar in the water by an occasional stir when the pan is on the fire, then add the cream of tartar and boil up to 300, lift the pan on to the side of the furnace and add butter in small pieces broken off by the hand; slip the pan on the fire again, adding the lemon flavoring; let it boil through so that all the butter is boiled in then pour into frames; when partly cold mark with cutter into small squares; when cold divide the squares; wrap each in wax-paper; sold generally in one cent packages.

N.B.—There is good butter scotch and better butter scotch, but no bad butter scotch; this quality may be improved by the addition of a large proportion of butter: some makers would put 2 lbs. or even 3 lbs. to this quantity, but that would be regulated by the class of trade and the size squares. These frames are made to hold 144 squares; a boil this size will make each square weigh about 1 oz., but any weight of square may be arranged by the adding or deducting from the boil.

 

EVERTON TAFFY.

12 lbs. White Sugar.
2 lbs. Dark Sugar.
2 lbs. Fresh Butter.
½ oz. Cream of Tartar.
2 quarts Water.
Lemon Flavoring.

Process.—Melt the sugar in the water, add the cream of tartar and boil the whole to the degree of 300; lift the pan on the side of the fire put in the butter in small pieces, place the pan again on the fire and let it boil through; add the lemon and give it time to mix in, then pour out contents into frame, or on pouring plate to cut up into bars. Everton taffy and butterscotch are similar, except in color; same remarks as to quality will apply in both cases; if the fire is very fierce, do not put the pan down flat on it after adding butter; nurse it gently to prevent burning; little fresh coke shaken over the fire would assist.

RASPBERRY TAFFY.

14 lbs. White Sugar.
½ oz. Cream of Tartar.
Raspberry Flavor.
2 quarts Water.
Brilliant Rose.

Process.—Bring the sugar and water to a boil, add the cream of tartar, put on the lid for ten minutes, then uncover and immerse the thermometer; continue to boil to 300; tinge a bright red with liquid, brilliant rose; add raspberry essence; pour out on frame or pouring plate and mark into bars or squares of convenient size; when cold the taffy is ready for packing and sale.

FIG TAFFY.

10 lbs Good Yellow Sugar.
2 lbs. Glucose.
3 lbs Figs Chopped Fine.
3 pints Water.

Process.—Boil the sugar, water and glucose to a weak crack, 295; lift the pan partly off the fire, putting a piece of iron under it to prevent it burning; add the figs, gently letting the whole thoroughly boil through and mix; pour in oiled tins or on slab, and mark into squares. When adding the figs let them drop through the fingers, not in a heap.

WALNUT TAFFY.

5 lbs. Brown Sugar.
5 lbs. Crystal Sugar.
2½ lbs. Glucose.
3 lbs. Walnuts.
2 quarts Water.
Lemon Flavoring.

Process.—Shell the walnuts, peel off the skin chop very fine. Boil the glucose, sugar and water as before directed to the degree of weak crack, 300. Lift the pan a little from the fire; add the prepared nuts by letting them run through the finger gently; let the whole boil through, then add a few drops of the oil of lemon; when thoroughly mixed in, pour out the boil and mark into bars before too cold. The flavor is improved by roasting the walnuts a little before putting in the boil.

PEANUT CANDY.

Boil to the crack, 1 quart best New Orleans Molasses, 1 lb. glucose and 1 quart water.

Prepare the meats by removing the thin reddish skin in which they are enveloped and fill a tray to about the depth of an inch. Pour over them the hot candy prepared as directed, stirring the meats till each one is covered. A little less candy should be used than will suffice to entirely cover the meats, though each separate one should be covered, the object being to use just enough of the candy to cause the meats to adhere firmly together, thus forming a large cake, which when nearly cold may be divided into squares or bars with a sharp knife.

Almonds and other nuts may be used in the same manner above described.

BARCELONA TAFFY.

5 lbs. Brown Sugar.
5 lbs. Crystal Sugar.
3 lbs. Barcelona Nuts.
2 lbs. Glucose.
2 quarts Water.
Lemon Flavoring.

Prepare the nuts by chopping them fine, boil the sugar, glucose and water to the degree 300. Remove the pan a little from the fire add the nuts carefully; when thoroughly boiled through and amalgamated, add a few drops of lemon and pour out contents into frame or on pouring plate and mark into bars.

COCONUT TAFFY.

6 lbs. Granulated Sugar.
2 lbs. Desiccated Cocoanut Unsweetened.
4 lbs. Brown Sugar.
2 lbs. Glucose.
3 pints Water.
Lemon Flavoring.

Process. —Melt the sugars in the water, bring it to the boil, add the glucose and continue to boil to the degree 300; lift the pan a little way from the fire; let the desiccated cocoanut run gently in the boil; continue to boil until the lot is well mixed through; add a few drops of oil of lemon and pour out in frames; use the lemon cautiously, too much spoils the flavor.

COCONUT TAFFY OR STICK JAW.

6 lbs. Granulated Sugar.
4 lbs. Brown sugar.
3 pints Water.
2 lbs. Glucose.
4 Large Cocoanuts Sliced.

Process. —Boil to crack 310 by the thermometer, the sugar, glucose and water; have the cocoanut freshly peeled and sliced ready; raise the pan two or three inches from the fire; slide in the nut, stirring gently with spatula to keep them off the bottom till well boiled through, then pour out in tins or frames.

N.B.—Stir gently only the one way or you may grain the boil.