The Candy Maker’s Guide: Cream

VANILLA CREAM BARS.

7 lbs. White Sugar.
2 lbs. Glucose.
3 pints Water.
Vanilla Flavoring.

Process.—Dissolve the sugar with water in a clean pan; add the glucose and boil in the usual way to the degree of feather, 243; pour the contents on a damp slab; let it remain a few minutes to cool; then with a pallette knife work it up to white cream, adding a tint of blue to bleach it; when the whole has become a smooth cream, return it to the pan and melt it just sufficient that it may pour out smooth and level; stir in the flavor and run on pouring plate ½ inch thick; when set cut into bars.

RASPBERRY OR ROSE CREAM BARS.

7 lbs. White Sugar.
2 lbs. Glucose.
3 pints Water.
Raspberry or Rose Flavor.

Process.—Melt the sugar in the water, add the glucose and boil to 243; pour contents on slab, and when cool divide the boil into three parts; color one part red, add some pure chocolate to another, and to a third add a pinch of blue, cream each part by rubbing on slab to a smooth paste; in rubbing in the pure chocolate, see that you have enough to make it a rich brown; for red portion use just sufficient to give a light rose pink. When all finished, melt each portion separately in the pan just sufficiently soft to run to a level surface; pour out first the red, then the chocolate on top of red sheet, then the white on top of chocolate; this will make a cream cake to cut up into bars. Some do not take the trouble to melt the cream, being satisfied to spread the paste out, smoothing it on top with a pallette knife; this answers the purpose but does not look so well.

COCONUT CREAM.

7 lbs. White Sugar.
3 lbs. Coconut peeled and sliced.
2 lbs. Glucose.
Red Coloring.
3 pints Water.

Process.—Boil the sugar, glucose and water in the usual way to the degree 245; pour contents on slab; divide the boil into two lots; when cool, color one part light pink and put a small touch of blue in the other; add the sliced coconut, half into each part, then commence to cream them by rubbing. When both parts have been mixed into a smooth paste, it is ready for sale, being usually sold by cutting from rough block.

N.B.—Cut almonds, ground walnuts, etc., are used in the same way as directed for cocoanuts. The boils may or may not be flavored, but a little improves it and makes it fragrant.

MAPLE CREAM.

8 lbs. Yellow Sugar.
1 quart Sweet Cream.
2 lbs. Glucose.

Process.—Boil the sugar, glucose and cream to 242 on thermometer, stirring all the time; when done lift off the fire and let stand till nearly cold (placing it where it will cool quickly), then stir until it sets; then melt over a slow fire (stirring constantly) until it becomes a nice creamy consistency, pour on a well greased tin, lay about one inch deep, let stand till cold, when by turning over the tin it will fall out. After the batch is set to cool in the tin, on no account disturb it as it will make the cream crack into pieces when turning out. If this is too expensive a recipe use milk instead of cream and add half a pound of butter.

CREAM FOR CHOCOLATE CREAMS OR BARS.

10 lbs. White Sugar.
3 pints Water.
2½ lbs. Glucose.

Process.—Put the sugar, glucose and water in a clean pan and boil in the usual way until the batch reaches the degree of feather 245; (keep the sides of the pan free from sugar); pour out on damp pouring plate and let it remain till nearly cold; then with long pallette knife commence to rub the sugar against the plate and work it about until it changes from a clear syrup to snow white creamy substance; then knead it with the hand until of uniform softness and no lumps left in the mass; it is now ready for use and may be kept covered in stoneware jars until required for various purposes. In winter the sugar need not be boiled so high; in hot weather, a little higher. When packing the cream away in jars it is better to keep the top moist by laying on a damp cloth before putting in the cork. Seeing that cream keeps so well, of course it is saving to make much larger batches at a time. This can be easily arranged by multiplying the proportions according to size of pan and convenience. These proportions are a guide, but the writer knows of no absolute must be this or that, although he has made as many cream goods as most people and with as much success. He has seen as fine a sample made in the same workshop when the boil was made up a little different. However, in submitting his own formula, it may be taken for granted he is not a mile from the bull’s eye.